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Summary & Resources:

Andrew Deutsch from Fangled Tech joins us on the podcast today to discuss the need for sales and marketing communication, and the power of creating strong brand advocates to should your name from the hill tops.

In this episode:

  • Learn how Fangled Tech helps companies in over 120 countries
  • The importance of finding your company’s value proposition
  • Getting marketing and sales to communicate better
  • Creating advocates for your brand
  • Benefits of being a sponsored podcast
  • How to really become a thought leader
  • Improving sales funnels through failures
  • Gathering “suspects” for your business
  • Hitting on the value your customers are actually looking for
  • The truth about selling
  • Using a virtual camera in the world of online meetings
  • How to adapt to a pandemic business world
  • Should you use sales funnel templates?
  • Doing business on a Telex

Resources:

FangledCast  Learn from various experts as they discuss sales, marketing, business, and much more.
 

Fangled Tech website  Do you need a voracious horde of advocates who love your brand, and want to shout your name from the hilltops? Check out how Fangled Tech can help you build your army of advocates.

Virtual Presenter Course  (affiliate link) - Ready to be the absolute winner of online meetings in today’s pandemic world? Check out the Virtual Presenter Course and learn how to master virtual presentations. Use this affiliate link for $50 off today!

Video Interview With Andrew Deutsch

Episode Transcript:

 

Justin

Hey everybody, this is Justin Coleman with the Master Sales Funnels Podcast Today I have a guest who is a multilingual global strategic marketing and sales consultant who successfully driven growth in more than 100 countries. It is Andrew Deutsch.

 

How are you doing today, Andrew?

 

Andrew

Doing great. Thanks for having me on. I appreciate it.

 

Justin

Sure, sure. You are the founder of Finegold Tech, is that correct?

 

Andrew

That’s correct. Yeah.

 

Justin

All right. You want to tell us a little bit about Fangled Tech and what you do?

 

Andrew

Sure. We’re a strategy first marketing and sales consultancy. So we help clients get really to the core of who their customer is, what are the needs, desires, pains. And then we work with our client to understand how they differentiate in ways that actually matter to that customer and also put them in an advantageous space over all of the alternatives to the solutions to those problems that the customers have. And because of the way we’re set up, we have relationships in about 120 different countries around the world.

 

And if they want to go beyond that domestic strategy, we can build a core strategy that can take them almost anywhere in the world. So once you build… You know, the difference between us and an agency, we build that core strategy with our customer before they go to market. Then we reach for the tools, because tools don’t do you much good if you don’t have a set of plans.

 

Justin

Yeah, you definitely need a plan. So you kind of take businesses and help them figure out like their customers journey, the buyer’s journey. Is kind of what you map out?

 

Andrew

That’s part of it. Also, what is the true value proposition? You know, so many times you’ll hear sales teams go, “well, you guys, you got to go out and sell the value” and they have no idea what that is. Or they’re out promoting all of the great things that they’re really proud of, that the customer couldn’t care less about their interests and their needs are other things that you do that you’re unaware of.

 

Justin

Yeah, that seems to be really hard for businesses to kind of put themselves second and their customers first.

 

Andrew

Yeah, I mean, I joke because I like to make up numbers that aren’t real since I don’t have a real statistic. We’re going to say 90%. 90% of the clients that we work with don’t really understand who their customer is and what their needs and what what makes them tick. And we really can dig into that and understand it. Because if you truly can listen and understand each of the different personas that do business with you, you then know what direction to follow, what are the things that are important to them.

 

You know, if you’re a company proud that you source all of your steel in the United States. So it’s all U.S. Steel, and then you talk to your customer, they go, “yeah, I need steel. That’s not what I’m interested in. Is your product safe? Will your product be able to increase my production? Will your product be able to make me money?” There’s real values in what you get out of it that the features have nothing to do with.

 

So it’s a different model, but at the end of the day, when you truly understand who that customer is and you meet them at that model of the world, it’s so much easier for them to understand the value that you bring forward.

 

Justin

Sure. So, yeah, market research, very important. Do you like survey their customers, create focus groups?

 

Andrew

More focus groups and direct conversations with their customers. Who wants to fill out another survey.

 

Justin

Unless you’re making, you know, 15 cents per survey…

 

Andrew

If one more hotel sends me the survey after I leave the room and keep sending it and sending it, I’ll stop going to that hotel chain. I think we are all surveyed out.

 

Justin

Get a one star review just for sending too many surveys.

 

Andrew

Yeah, it happens. It happens.

 

Justin

All right. So what types of businesses do you work with? You work with like smaller firms, larger firms? I notice you said steel, so like manufacturing?

 

Andrew

Up until maybe a year and a half, two years ago, almost all of our business was in the B2B industrial space, mostly manufacturers and industrial distributors. But we’ve expanded quite a bit just based on referrals and following on accomplishment.

 

So now there’s there’s a good percentage, I would say somewhere between 20, 25 percent of our businesses in the consumer space now. The places we don’t play, like, for example, I don’t do marketing for law firms, for insurance companies. Highly regulated, because there’s there’s so much expertise that we don’t have in-house for those those markets that we would prefer to refer them to folks who really specialize in that.

 

Justin

Yeah, stick to what you know.

 

Andrew

Yeah. It’s you know, there’s just just down to the language that has to be used. What you can and can’t say in those markets is for real specialized marketing agency approach. Not not us.

 

Justin

Okay. Do you do any, like auditing of the company itself? I mean, I know, like, a lot of issues for companies are having, like marketing and sales talk to each other basically and kind of jive together, is that what you do?

 

Andrew

All the time. All the time. It’ all part of really expanding how that company communicates with the customer and also internally. So, so often the challenge that a company has is they don’t know their customer and they don’t know each other within their own organization. You’ve got sales and marketing teams that are going to battle every day instead of working together on a common goal.

 

Justin

Yeah, yeah. I’ve seen that a lot in companies that I’ve worked for and I’m just myself and my own business. And I battle myself all the time. So it’s ongoing.

 

Andrew

You ever give yourself a black eye? That wouldn’t be good.

 

Justin

Is that possible? I don’t know if I could hit myself that hard.

 

Andrew

I don’t know. You let me know.

 

Justin

I don’t want to find out. I see on your website that part of what you do is create what you call brand advocates for companies. You want to go into that a little bit?

 

Andrew

Yeah. What we tell every day and people get sick of me saying it, but it’s who we are. We help our customers convert every touch into voracious advocates for their brand. And it really goes to the whole sales funnel conversation that we’re probably leading to. If you look at the old models of the sales funnel, you’ll see whatever the sales process is going from awareness to purchase, you’ll see old models. The marketing teams involved in the first two steps, and then they throw it over the wall to the sales team and they close and they get the business.

 

And that model is so stale and gone because if you don’t look all the way through the funnel together from sales and marketing to the point that you convert that guy who just bought, or even the guy who loves your product but can’t quite afford it now, into someone who goes out and shouts from the hilltop, how wonderful you are. You miss the opportunity for all of that, that free publicity. So so in our model, the funnel looks like a funnel, but then it opens back up like an hourglass where we collect those advocates. And the marketing team is constantly working all the way through the process and focused on those that we’ve collected at the end.

 

Because those people, you know, think about why when a company like Apple launches a product that nobody’s ever touched and there’s people around the block ready to buy it. Because they’ve created brand advocates that they can’t go away.

 

In the industrial space, I was working for a long time in different industries by coincidence, each of them ended up competing with 3M. In the packaging industry, in the adhesives industry and others. And the one consistent thing you would hear from a buyer when you were talking to them, why do you do business with 3M? They had a mantra. Nobody ever got fired for buying from 3M. The buyers became advocates because they knew buying from 3M, even if the pricing wasn’t the best and otherwise there would never be a product failure, there’d never be a late delivery because of the reputation of the company. And as an advocate for them, I’m an advocate because they keep me employed. So those are sort of two different models of what we’re talking about there.

 

And by the way, that they can be beaten in the market. We’ve done it. But but we had to fight that advocate, which was much harder than dealing with companies that didn’t have that reputation with the buyers.

 

Justin

Sure. Yeah. It’s all about customer service and making sure you’re delivering what people actually want.

 

Andrew

Yup. And and much more.

 

Justin

Yeah. But it definitely, I think starts with creating those those raving fans. I learned a lot about that in reading Expert Secrets by Russell Brunson. I don’t know if you’ve read that one.

 

Andrew

I have not, but I’m familiar with the book though.

 

Justin

Yeah. It talks about becoming the expert and creating raving fans for your brand. And so it’s not really like an affiliate program, right? You’re just creating service that’s so good that people want to tell other people about it.

 

Andrew

We’ve done affiliate programs as part of the advocacy. There’s a video course that we created, The Virtual Presenter Course, I was showing you before playing around with how I can do all sorts of crazy graphics and stuff in a meeting. We developed that course it’s part of an affiliate program. So whenever I give a presentation that uses the tech, people will say, “oh, my God, how’d you do that? Can you teach me?”

 

Well, I give them a link, which is my affiliate link to my own website, and it gets them a discount and gets them to go. Now, when somebody finishes the course, we offer them to become an affiliate. And what that means is they get the right to give any of their people $50s off. And if somebody buys the course, they get a commission. So it’s 20% of what the cart is. So that means that if anyone who takes our course can find five people who also can benefit from the course, the course was free.

 

But we’ve had situations, I think now where people who’ve taken the course have almost turned it into a side gig with the amount of people that they’ve excited and got to take the course on how to how to do it through that affiliate program. And the next level of it, the experiment is leading towards how podcasts can actually get sponsors much earlier in the cycle than they ever could before.

 

Because, you know, you become a podcaster which means you had an idea and then you get two of your buddies to listen to it. And then eventually you’ve got an audience. The next step where you’re really in the game is when you can say, “hi, this is Justin. Welcome to the podcast. Today we’re sponsored by”.

 

Well with an affiliate marketing program. We can say to you, look, tell people you’re a sponsored podcast. And if anybody clicks on our link because you do such a great ad, you’ll also get paid for it. But the reality is, even if even if nobody ever clicked on the link, you’re still a sponsored podcast, which is next level.

 

So we’re looking at how that could work for different products. There’s a client that we have who manufactures a diaper rash cream. It’s a formula that hasn’t changed since the 1920s. Their grandfather had the business and they inherited it. And we’re looking at a program: how are they going to be able to get interviewed at 100 and Mommy and me podcasts, blogs and otherwise, and sponsor every one of them?

 

Why not grow your business without paying the Google monster?

 

Justin

Right. You know, you want to talk a little bit about your podcast and how that came about, just kind of reaching out to customers? 

 

Andrew

Yeah. Well, you know, the strategy behind the podcast has never been to have a million listeners and get sponsors and all of that. What our podcast, The Fangledcast, which you can find it on YouTube as The Fangledcast, Fangledcast one word, the concept of it was sort of my pushback to this idea of thought leadership. You ever notice that the people who tell you they’re thought leaders or influencers have never led a thought and or influence anyone?

 

Because, yeah at the end of the day, who gets to decide if you’re a thought leader? The people listening to you. So what we decided to do is sort of a way for people to observe… How we work at Fangled is to find topics that really matter to business people and then find an expert to have a conversation to dig deep into that in lots of different directions about that issue.

 

So, for example, I had a gentleman whose business as a consultant is based on research that he’s done, that high levels of curiosity throughout a company give you a higher productivity.

 

So he’s developed a method of measuring levels of curiosity, coaching to increase those levels, improving the increased productivity in an organization. That was an interesting conversation.

 

Now, if somebody who listens to the podcast and goes, “wow, that’s really great information, it’d be great to reach out to him”. But it wasn’t an interview for him to brag about and sell his company. It was more about people to really understand who he is and what he does.

 

And most of the episodes… Next week I’ve got a gentleman who grew up on the Navajo Nation. Actually, Diné is how they prefer to be called. And the question was, how does someone from an environment without real entrepreneurial role models get the spark and become a true entrepreneur? He has his own clothing company. Coming off, you know, in a lot of the stuff that goes on in our Native American reservations. And the kind of lives that they have, it’s interesting that somebody could be inspired through family to become what he’s become. So we had that conversation.

 

Justin

Yeah, it’s amazing what kind of stories you can find with pretty much anybody. I mean, everybody pretty much has a story. It’s definitely more interesting having somebody on the podcast. I mean, my audience is just had to listen to me so far, since you’re my first guest so thank you for being here again. It’s been, I mean, a good conversation so far and it’s a lot more interesting.

 

Andrew

But from this point on, I’m going to get really boring. So I apologize for that.

 

Justin

No, don’t do that. Going back to sales funnels a little bit, do you map out sales funnels for your clients?

 

Andrew

We do. And there isn’t… In my experience, there isn’t a specific process that works for every buying cycle for a customer. And that’s something that when we’re building that initial strategy that we really look at. Because, when for example, when we’re doing industrial machinery, imagine, you know, we were selling strapping equipment where an installation could be one point two, one point three million dollars. The sales cycle for that is significantly different than a guy who’s in the industrial supply area selling packaging envelopes. All of the motivators, the levels, the sales in those things.

 

So there are slight alterations in terms of the in that sales funnel, the probabilities per stage and the merging of stages and things like that. So we map it specific to each project rather than go with a cookie cutter, you know, interest, delight, whatever, however whatever process you use.

 

And the other thing, the other thing that we’ve discovered is sales funnels are better when they have leaks at each stage because the data you get is extremely valuable. So, you know, as you’re going down through the funnel and you’re reducing the motivations as to why those things leave the funnel are so important in terms of pulling out for data, for research to make better funnels in the future. And also sometimes the valuable information can be sold and aid other companies that do things you don’t, that serve markets you don’t serve.

 

So there’s a lot you can do with that data besides just, you know, kiss or kill. They bought, great. If not, they’re dead to me. That process doesn’t work for us.

 

Justin

Yeah, I’ve noticed that with a lot of people when they’re funnels fail, “oh funnels don’t work.” It’s because they don’t go in, they don’t dig in, they don’t, you know, go through that process of finding those leaks and figuring out how to patch the holes and make their conversion rates better.

 

Andrew

Or profit from the holes.

 

Justin

You want to go into that a little more?

 

Andrew

Well, I’ll give you an example. One of our our initiatives, we work with a company that has an A.I. Specific to industrial distribution. And what that that A.I. does is it’s constantly taking the data from that funnel, the yesses and the no’s and refining the probability of suggested items with with a customer. So I’ll give you an example. Imagine if a home, a Home Depot was selling to industry, not just you know, they’ve got ladders, nails, lumber.

 

So they’re now, an industrial company. So they’re selling fasteners, they’re selling adhesives, they’re selling cutting tools. All of this for the metal fab world. And you know that the customer who’s in metal fabrication that you’re going to be selling to fits a certain persona. So you can look at all of the data from every similar customer in the history of your company to know what are the most popular items, what order were items purchased in all of that sort of stuff.

 

So now you got a brand new salesman came on board, you got a thousand page catalog. All that salesperson needs to do to start to learn the product and attend the customer is to look at what the A.I. is telling them. You’ve met a customer who fits in Category A who does this, these are the four items that are 90 percent probability will open a sale for you and you can go to that and use it. And so forth as you go down.

 

You’ve got a salesman who’s satisfied because he’s making enough money. The same system is through that funnel research over the past is telling them, “hey, there’s three new people in your territory. You need to go talk to them.” And make them responsible for it. There’s a whole thing behind that. But what happens is at each stage of that funnel, if that proposal went out based on the probability of sale and they get no’s, it automatically in living form will adjust those probabilities. Am I making sense or am I getting a little into the weeds?

 

Justin

I think so. I mean, it recalculates as it gets data basically for you.

 

Andrew

So if you’ve generated a thousand potential leads for your company at the top of the funnel, these are what I always… I don’t call them leads. I call them suspects. I suspect there could be some business there. I haven’t qualified them yet. But out of those thousand, when it gets to the next level, there’s only four left. I know from that I’ve just learned I’m not gathering suspects properly. If all of them are prime and they get down to the next level, then I know that I can continue to put those type on top.

 

As soon as they start to get bad, I should know that. So at each each of these stages, when it starts to leak, it should trigger a signal to the people involved at each level of that process. If we get to the pitch phase where we’re actually writing proposals and nobody’s buying, it doesn’t mean that we’ve got a bad product, doesn’t mean that we got a bad salesman. What it means is that we’re not hitting on the value that that particular customer is looking for.

 

So we’re selling that our car is made of steel, not our car is really cool. Or that car will find you someone of the opposite sex who thinks you’re attractive or whatever that real motivator is that people buy cars for. We’re out talking about the fact our cars are made of steel. The customer doesn’t care. They know it’s steel. They want comfort or they want safety or they want you know, those are… So that’s what I’m talking about in terms of the funnel being a place to learn from, not just a place to discard bad leads.

 

Justin

Sure. Is all of that data that’s calculated, is that a software technology that you’ve developed? Or do you use like a third party software that kind of feeds you information?

 

Andrew

Again, depending on who the customer is, we build that into their CRM. We can do that as part of the process within Dynamic. We can do it within Salesforce. We can do it within a custom CRM like Sugar and otherwise. And then there’s in the A.I. world we have if someone is in the industrial distribution space with more than a few hundred, SKUs, we have an actual partner that we work with that has a software CRM of their own that’s proprietary for that market.

 

Justin

OK, yeah. Like I said, I’m a little one man shop. I don’t know if you’ve heard of Funnelytics, but you put a little code on your website and it kind of calculates your conversions for you through your pages. But I know with like industries and stuff, it’d be a lot more complicated to track since it’s not all on the website.

 

Andrew

Well, think about a company. Are you familiar with Granger?

 

Justin

Farm equipment?

 

Andrew

No. Granger is a… I think they have more than a million SKUs in their industrial supply catalog. You can get any kind of fastener, tape, testing equipment. If you go in someone’s office who has it, I don’t even know if the books are around anymore, but it’s a book that if you ever get really mad at somebody, you could really do damage to them. And they’re all over the country and they I think they have a million items in their book.

 

So our system, if they were using it, when the customer service person answered the phone, not only would they know what to suggest to a customer based on who they are, but they also would be able to suggest additional products at the time that somebody’s placing an order because it actually will go through all of that data and constantly update. And based on who that customer is, what industry they’re in and what their persona is within that industry, it would provide those types of suggestions.

 

Justin

Yeah, that’s good. That’s what I would call an upsell. So that’s part of funnels.

 

Andrew

We’ve seen customers that hooked up that A.I. and within a couple of months saw the increase in spending of their customers as much as 20, 25%. That’s significant in an industry where a two percent increases with customers is considered, you know, fantastic.

 

Justin

Yeah, and a lot of people seem to be afraid to sell things because that seems to be like slimy, they think car salesmen. But the way you describe it, I mean, you’re just giving them the next thing that helps solve their problems.

 

Andrew

Yeah. Here’s the thing. When somebody says I don’t like to be sold, what they mean is I don’t like to be lied to. I don’t like to be talked down to. I don’t like to be pressured. I don’t like to be closed. People love to be sold. What selling is is me listening and understanding what your needs are, what your pains are, and then offering to fix those for you for money.

 

Justin

Right.

 

Andrew

I tell this to people all the time, sales is like romance. If both parties aren’t enjoying it, you’re not doing it right.

 

Really, it’s a bug for me when I hear “nobody wants to be sold”. I love to be sold when somebody can solve my problems and get me what I need and make it easy for me and give me the best customer experience ever. I love it.

 

Someone wants to talk crap and try to, you know, look at me like a buzzard looking at a carcass on the road because I’m their prey, that I don’t like so much.

 

Justin

Yeah, yeah. I think a lot of people need to get into more of that mindset that we’re helping people through sales. I mean, I know I had a problem with that when I was getting started was, you know, I can’t offer anybody anything. Like who am I to offer people something? Well, if we know the solution to their problem, then it’s our job to show that to them.

 

Andrew

Yeah. Yeah, and sales has gotten a bad rap because the old car dealer, used car dealer adage, you know, the guy selling subprime life insurance and, you know, trying to get the close to get you. You know, nobody wants to feel bad. But if if the sale means I’m going to get something that’s going to make me feel better, make my life better, solve my problem. People love it.

 

Justin

Yup. What was that technology you were showing me earlier with the wings and the moon? What was that called again?

 

Andrew

Well, it’s software. What I do is I create what’s called a virtual camera. So on your computer, what’s happening is this software is looking at your camera. On mine, I have a separate piece of software that sees my camera that then creates a camera image that goes into this. So it’s like having my own little TV studio.

 

We sell a course, go to virtualpresentercourse.com. I’ll actually, if you want when you post this, I can give you a link to put into the…

 

Justin

Yeah, I’ll be sure to link to it.

 

Andrew

 …so people can find it. And what it does is it allows me to control what goes on in the meeting. So, for example, when in a Zoom meeting, when people give their PowerPoint presentation, what happens? Their head disappears and there’s a voice and you’re watching a boring presentation.

 

What we do during a presentation is I’ll shrink down in the presentation. Have my presentation going, somebody asked me a question, I join right back in and I can address it and do all sorts… I mean, joking around, like, you know, if something I think is a good idea, I have a good idea (light bulb appears). And if, you know, some just want to have a little bit of fun, I can, you know, put on my bat wings and make them flap around as as it…

 

…my favorite, though, is when somebody because I again, I’m not much into the cliches. Whenever somebody says, hey, Andrew, what’s your elevator speech? I go, I don’t know, let’s go to my elevator (elevator doors appear on screen and open) and give my elevator speech as to what my company is about.

 

So there’s a lot you can do with it. With webinars and green screens, I could set it up that it looks like you and I are sitting at the same table so that we’re giving a presentation together at the same time. There’s just… It’s limitless how the creativity… We were doing a branding initiative with a client, and what I did is I split the screen in two, so I had a word document open on one side of the screen and me on the other. And as people were throwing out their suggestions and ideas, I was typing them in and they could read them on the screen. I can also create a whiteboard and actually write on the screen while we’re talking. So it’s just it’s an incredible tool.

 

And the software itself is free. It’s an open source. It’s what the kids use when they play their video games on Twitch for their buddies. But we’ve adapted it for how to use that software for business purposes.

 

Justin

Was this something that was born out of work from home and the pandemic or was this pre pandemic?

 

Andrew

Understand, my career mostly was overseas. I spent the first half of my adult life traveling and living abroad. So for me to communicate with family and otherwise, I’ve been video chatting for 20 something years since the before Skype existed. So when the pandemic hit and everyone was doing it, people were already starting to feel the fatigue. So I started adapting this software out of an idea so that I could give presentations that people would never forget.

 

Justin

Yeah.

 

Andrew

And by the way, the software will not help if you’re a crappy speaker. You have to have good speaking skills. You’ve got to be able to present. Otherwise, you’re a guy with a bad speech and gizmos. But when you do it the right way, it really enhances, you know, who you are and how you speak.

 

And we talk about it all the time. It’s the only way I know that I can be present in the room when I can’t physically be there. So, yeah, that’s that’s where it came out of.

 

Justin

Yeah. That’s awesome. Is there any advice you would give to people who need to adapt their business model to like work from home and post pandemic world?

 

Andrew

Yeah, you’ve got to trust your people. The biggest challenge happened… you know when it all started and the data was showing us that people were so much more productive working from home and happier and otherwise. And now we’re at the other end of the curve where people are like, “God, I wish I could go back to the office. I’m sick of being in the same room. I want to be around people”.

 

And then there’s also the question of, are people still as productive? I don’t think so. There’s only so much that can happen. Especially if you’re in the creative end of a business, where being in the room and bouncing ideas off of people. It’s still not the same. The software and being able to do what I do helps, you know, make it a little bit better. But I think that the future is still going to be a hybrid where businesses are going to be able to trust their people more, that they can work from home a couple of days.

 

You know, like, for example, schools closed and parents don’t know what to do with their kids. Now, you know what? Work from home today. It’s going to be that  type of a change. But the number one thing is you’ve got to improve your ability to write and communicate. You’ve got to improve your ability to connect and listen, because it’s much harder through video than it is in person. You don’t get those nuances. You know, when somebody wants to call you an idiot, all they have to do is hit the mute button, turn their head and go, “you son of a…” and then come back on and you don’t know. You can’t do that in the office.

 

If want to roll your eyes when someone says something that you think is dopey, you get caught in the office, on this you can just turn the window off for a second.

 

Justin

Yeah. My mute button was always my my kids in the background trying to talk to people on my meetings and stuff so…

 

Andrew

Yeah, yeah. It’s fun when the dog barks.

 

Justin

Oh yeah. That too.

 

Andrew

And it’s weird when you’re in a meeting and there’s three people petting their cats while you’re trying to talk about something critical.

 

Justin

Yeah, for sure. Is there anything else that you want to say to the listeners about your company or about sales funnels? Sales and marketing in general?

 

Andrew

Yeah, I think the most important thing that I, you know, sales funnels are brilliant when they’re not made from a cookie cutter. That you’re following the same exact pattern for every project that’s out there is a huge mistake. You still, before you can begin a sales funnel, have to go back and understand really who the customer is and how they do… Where are they? How do they buy? What’s the customer experience that’s optimal to get them to buy?

 

And then you can build that funnel and start to work it, and constantly understand that the elimination of people through that funnel is a learning experience. And the no’s don’t hurt so bad when you learn something from them.

 

Justin

Ok. So all the companies that have like templates and that kind of thing, I think… Is that a good place to start?

 

Andrew

It can’t be. It can be. But, you know, sales and marketing have to be involved in every step along the way. And never, never forget that once somebody purchased from you, if you don’t continue to have a relationship with that person, you’ve completely destroyed the entire potential for having a massive hoard of brand advocates out there shouting your praises from the hill top.

 

Justin

All right. Where can people find you and what you’re offering?

 

Andrew

I’m right here. Oh, you mean on the web? Our website is fangledtech.com. The podcast is thefangledcast.com, where we have our video production on YouTube under The Fangledcast. And then we’re on I don’t know how many hundred of the other podcast places where it gets distributed audio only.

 

We don’t have a fax machine, so don’t fax us. Our Telex is broken. Smoke signals work.

 

Justin

I don’t even know what a Telex is. Is that a fax machine?

 

Andrew

No, no. Telex. Do you want to know what a Telex is?

 

Justin

Yeah, go for it.

 

Andrew

You ever seen the old movies. It looks like a computer terminal kind of thing with a big keyboard. It makes a lot of noise. So they had him in offices all over the world. It was before the Internet, and each one had a unique address. So on a Telex you would type, you first add the address. And as you’re typing here, if the guy you’re typing to is in Bogota, Colombia, it’s printing out on his machine there.

 

Justin

All right. And was that pre-fax?

 

Andrew

So back in the day when I used to travel internationally before the fax machines were everywhere. You would sit in the lobby of a third-world hotel and wait for a kid on a motorcycle to come back from the telex office with the response for the message you had just sent.

 

Justin

Oh, my. Things have become so much easier.

 

Andrew

Yeah, I remember the fax machine came out. Nothing could ever be better than that. Yeah, I think it has.

 

Justin

For sure. All right. Well, Andrew, it’s been great to have you on the podcast today.

 

Andrew

I really appreciate it.

 

Justin

Yeah. For those of you listening, if you want to check out the show notes, there’ll be a transcript at mastersalesfunnels.com/029. And I’ll also have links to Fangled Tech there for you as well. As always, thanks for listening and Keep Funnelin’.

 

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